Entries in #island (5)

Wednesday
Nov302016

Meet Project Coordinator Celine Kerslake-Sim

Celine first arrived in Nosy Be in March this year, for 6 months, as the Teaching Project Coordinator; but soon after arriving home, decided that she missed it too much and needed to come back. This time she's here for a year as Project Coordinator for Frontier Madagascar. She clearly just can’t get enough of Madagascar! I interrogated her to find out more…

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Monday
Aug152016

A Madagascan Adventure

Where to begin? It’s been a crazy and amazing two weeks on this paradise island. Find out more about Simon's Madagascan Adventure in today's blog post...

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Wednesday
Aug032016

Life In Madagascar

Life in Madagascar is very relaxing and chilled but entertaining and vibrant at the same time. The members from the Youth Club always want to learn and engage with you and the locals may stare at you with a weird look, but once you say ‘Bonjour!’ they are happy to talk back.

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Thursday
Mar312016

Early Days In Madagascar 

My first couple of weeks in Madagascar have been a whirlwind of experiences. I’ve wandered down market streets, past schools, hospitals and orphanages, down to the port and past the post office - trying to get the lay of the land.

school walking us to massA lot to absorb and concentrate on through what is initially a pretty overwhelming heat – apparently some of the hottest days this summer. So apart from frazzling my skin (wear sun cream FROM DAY ONE!) and sweating my way through countless outfits, I’ve already been fully initiated into teaching some pretty huge classes at the local primary school along with volunteer Maria (who by the end of her first week was taking lessons virtually single handed).

Teaching a lessonMaria and I were also very privileged to be allowed along to Thursday Mass at the local church, where we enthusiastically mumbled along to the Malagasy tunes (but mostly just joined in with the actions)! At youth club, I encountered many enthusiastic young people, one of whom said his favourite thing about Nosy Be is its ambience – and I fully agree.

Everywhere you go there’s music playing and people smiling. Another student said his favourite thing about living here is showing visitors from abroad sights that they could never have seen at home – again, he’s totally right, this is definitely a country to be proud of. You can’t help but admire the views wherever you go, because it’s all beautiful. I can’t wait to see more of the island, meet more of its wonderful people and get completely stuck into giving back to this community along with all of the amazing volunteers!

By Celine Kerslake-Sim - Teaching & Community Project Coordinator

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Check out what volunteers in Madagascar are up to right now!

Monday
Nov232015

Everything the Light Touches

Here in Nosy Be, there is one thing that never changes. That would be the Sun. It’s always there, hanging out in the sky and generally being the Sun that us non-Brits know and love. There’s something I wanted to do in my 8 ½ months on the island that I have finally gotten to do: see the sunset and sunrise on Nosy Be in the same day. It was spectacular, though it requires a bit of effort.

First, you have to wake up at 4:30 in the morning (yup, don’t worry though, it’s worth it. Then is 15 minute hike to the other side of the peninsula that camp is on to a place we call Pebble Beach. Here you wait to see the incredible sunrise over the ocean. Then it’s back to camp, across the water to Hellville, and the rest of the morning/afternoon is yours to spend.

Then 4:00 comes around. Here you’re going to have to jump in a taxi and take a drive for an hour to a place called Mount Passot. This peak is the highest on the island and used to be used as a French watchtower for all of Nosy Be. The Malagasy government has commissioned paintings with everything you can see marked on the map so you can point out all the places you’ve been, or maybe find some places you want to go. They also have some placards describing the history of the island (though only in French in Malagasy so you may have to brush up on your French). After looking at the beauty of the island for half an hour the Sun begins to set and if you watch it set all the way you may be able to see the Green Flash if it’s a clear enough day.

Finally, its dinner and drinks in Ambadaloaka to celebrate a full day well spent enjoying the absolute stunning beauty of the island you’re living on and, really, the entire solar system.

By Mitchell Cahill - Community & Teaching Coordinator

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Check out what volunteers in Madagascar are up to right now!