Thursday
Jul242014

pancakes for breakfeast

What's this? Frontier Madagascar is now doing pancakes for breakfast once a week? Crikey!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Jul242014

Binoculars at the ready please 

We're going on a bird survey in the mangroves. Exciting times!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Jul242014

Making use of our new microscope

Our new microscope is beautiful and our beach conservation volunteers have been making great use of this analysing substrate samples from the local mangrove ecosystems. Awesome work!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Jul242014

Creative ideas

So we may have turned an old broken wet suit into large beer bottle holders, along with a lovely useful little pocket for beer money. Cold beer anyone?

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Jul242014

Patriotism ahoy!

Our wonderful marine volunteer Natalie, all the way from Hong Kong, is putting the finishing touches to her lovely flag.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Jul242014

Underwater fun

Underwater acrobatics!

Diving selfie                          Close encounters with the turtle kind

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Thursday
Jul242014

The underwater world beauty of Nosy Be

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

 

Thursday
Jul242014

Ready to Dive?

Oui. Time to head out to the boat through the magic gate.

Out on the boat and getting ready to shortly kit up

Some still manage to stay pretty even when under water

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Jul222014

Volunteer blog: Alfie Sheridan and Harry Gray

Crazy Awesome Nightwalk

Four intrepid explorers. One awesome nightwalk. What follows is a tale of high adventure, bizarre creatures and daring-do.

Stumbling through the dark we make it the whole of 50m before we are set upon by a pair of ferocious Mouse Lemurs; their luminous eyes piercing the gloom. Led by our courageous guide (Rich), we battle our way through brush and briar down a path, and into the jungle. One particular female Souimanga Sunbird was so startled by our sudden appearance that she froze like a small, green, feathered rabbit in our torch light, no doubt having just settled for a peaceful night in. Alas, no such rest for us... further adventure awaited!

Not five minutes later, Cynthia’s sharp eyes (and sharper camera) picked out a juvenile Uroplatus ebenaui curled up, pretending to be a leaf. Its dragon-like head, in an odd juxtaposition with its rather puny tail; but an adorable specimen nonetheless. Almost invisible on its branch, this was a rare and miraculous find.

Of the three lemur species on Nosy Be, two are nocturnal. Having only just recovered from our encounter with the Mouse Lemurs we are struck by the fearsome cuddliness of a Hawk’s Sportive Lemur, not 3 feet from our path. Sleepy and somewhat unimpressed, he viewed us with mild dismay, before trundling off into the shadows. However, just when we thought the night had run out of surprises, the piece-de-resistance was pulled out of the hat.

On our way back to camp the brilliant red and white chest and dagger-like bill of a Madagascar Pygmy Kingfisher was illuminated roosting just above our heads. Although normally only seen as a flash of crimson, this particular individual sat calmly, allowing us to admire his dinky, yet regal shape. This was truly the cherry on a well-iced cake.

Finally, it was time for a night-time shower under the stars, watched by a worryingly voyeurific Crested Drongo.

By Alfie Sheridan and Harry Gray, terrestrial volunteer research assistants

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Jul222014

Volunteer blog: Alex Simon

Love is without doubt one of the most powerful and endearing phrases that is used within the human language. It is an eternal presence within our fast-paced lives, being taken for granted and overused without a true understanding of the word. With multiple meanings from an expression that exaggerates the passion you feel for a certain activity or object to absolute heartfelt sincerity of another person. Couple this with plausibly the greatest gift we were given as a species then you really have a phrase that can send tingles through anyone’s spine. The phrase in question being ‘I LOVE LEARNING’, although it can seem a childish and simple phrase, aren’t the simple things in life those we keep most precious to us?

We learn everyday so the fact people could argue they don’t find it stimulating will become masters of their own downfall. Without being able to learn and process unfamiliar information into a form that our brain can understand, as a species we wouldn’t have evolved and become the stewards of the earth God intended for us to be when he put us on this incredible place we call home.

Knowledge throughout the world is regarded as a powerful tool, whether it is academic or life, the more you know the further you will go in your respected field. The self-confidence within a person becomes greater when they have a broader knowledge base and being able to share what you know with others gives you the feeling of self-accomplishment and satisfaction.

My own personal experience in sharing in this definitive phrase has come within the small camp of Nosy-Be. The fulfilment of becoming a wiser person in the field of the oceans many inhabitants and being able to acknowledge actual species and the incredible diversifications within this unknown world has only made my quest for knowledge become more intense. I have had but a mere sip of this ice cold beer known as territorial fish and now I want a crate. Looking through the many flashcards hidden away in the dusky science hut pining to be looked over and understood has re-lit a passion that has been dwindling for far too long. The feeling of success is immeasurable and all I can say is that to not use a gift as great as learning would be a damn shame.

To finish this brief but hopefully inspiring story, a great man once said we only use approximately 25-30% of our brains capacity and those who can broaden this capacity are classed as geniuses. Wouldn’t you like to be part of this rare yet special band of people?

By Alex Simon, Marine Volunteer Research Assistant

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Jul222014

work it!

This evening the terrestrial research team had a long and heated discussion on the effect of invasive species in young and established ecosystems and it certainly encouraged a lot of brain synapses to be used - great work!

Working on Spider Research is tough work but very rewarding.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Jul222014

Sunsets, communal lights and pumpkin!

Moody sunsets. Madagascar is good at these...

Lights all the way down the main communal dining table? Amazing.

Who likes Pumpkin? We love pumpkin.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Tuesday
Jul222014

Marine dreams

Our new delightful Dive Officer, Gin, has banged out a lovely staff photo. How pretty & Our incumbent Dive Officer, Marg, is back again for second year on the trot and has already added a level of calm, knowledge and indomitable enthusiasm for her role. What a woman. And a great staff photo.

Our wonderful senior marine staff team - excellent stuff.

Ready to Dive? Oui. Time to head out to the boat through the magic gate.

Out on the boat and getting ready to shortly kit up & The marine programme attracts all kinds - including these two superstars.

The marine world is a beautiful place. Where better than to float around surveying the amazing biodiversity than Madagascar?

Marine Surveying is important work analysing the health of the local coral systems and investigating the changes in the marine biodiversity.

Classic look from one of our current Marine Research Assistants. Georgia - PADI is proud of you.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Jul212014

A wonderful welcome

Our new welcome sign in Malagasy. Fabulous!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Jul212014

PADI Open Water Dive Training is exhausting stuff!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Jul212014

Butterfly whispering skills

Our butterfly surveys on the terrestrial programme have seen a drop in numbers over the dry season, yet RA Olivia Smith still appears to demonstrate some skills in butterfly whispering.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Jul212014

Up the hill

Another Epic Hill Climb Adventure enjoyed by the Terrestrial Team, braving the horrors of razor grass in order to enjoy some stunning views of the surrounding area!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Jul212014

Frontier Madagascar Team, July 2014

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

Monday
Jul212014

It's beach clean time again! 

Beach cleans are incredibly important to the well being of the local ecosystems since all non-organic detritus is removed allowing the local environment to live happily ever after. Great news!

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

 

Friday
Jul182014

7kg of zebu goodness

Biggest steak night ever in the history of Frontier Madagascar with 7kg of zebu consumed. Research Assistant Alfie Sheridan was a hero.

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Madagascar.

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