Entries in #sports (7)

Tuesday
Feb212017

Getting Busy In  Fiji

It’s starting to get busy here again in Fiji after the Christmas lull in volunteers and whilst it’s always nice to have company, the best part about new volunteers is the enthusiasm they bring for their projects.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Jan102017

Rugby!

Rugby is a religion here in Fiji. They eat, sleep and breathe it. Being here whilst the Olympic Gold was won was something very special and one of my lasting memories of Fiji. Now that the IRB World Sevens Series is also in full swing the fever has caught the nation once more.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Dec062016

An interview With Sports Coach, Hannah

Now that the school year is over, I wanted to find out what it was like coaching sport in a Fijian primary school. So I asked our Sports Coach Hannah a few questions!

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Nov012016

Sports Coaching in Fiji - Patrick Bird 

Sports Coaching volunteer Patrick Bird has spent two weekd on the project. Find out how he's been getting on in his blog..

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Mar022016

Stronger than Winston Rugby

Stronger together, weaker apart. A theme suitable given the recent destruction of Cyclone Winston, the strongest cyclone to have ever hit the Southern hemisphere on record.

Rugby, in particular, brings people together in Fiji as naturally as a coconut to gravity.

The Uprising Beach Resort, a favourite among our volunteers on the Coral Coast, partnered with the West Seven Series and Spain 7s to host the #StrongerThanWinston Rugby 7s Fundraising Appeal.

The Spanish national side, who have been training in Fiji to up their sevens game, and went on to win the Uprising tournament, not only donated the $2000 prize money to the Relief effort, but also created a fundraising account for the Fiji Red Cross Society on behalf of the global rugby community for the Cyclone Relief.

Among the Spanish 7s, were the Army, Army Nadroga, Barracudas, Hillview, McDonald’s Saunaka, Police, Samurai, Tabadamu, Uprising, Wardens, and Westfield, all strong 7s sides of Fiji who played hard to the support of the attending crowds.

The team that gave the greatest battle against the Spain 7s were the Wardens in the semi-finals with a final score of 15-14. The final was between the Spain 7s and the Police, with Spain winning a 24-14 clear lead.

The staff, one of our local partners and the volunteers all came along to support the event, to be entertained and to provide easily the loudest cheer. It was fun to yell in both Fijian and Spanish, and join in the spirit of the game.

The organisation was last minute, but wonderfully done. The live music by InsideOut was, as always, fantastic, and all games were on schedule. It was a great way to spend the weekend, and all for a good cause.

By Sophia Victorian - Project Coordinator

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Fiji.

Check out what volunteers in Fiji are up to right now!

Tuesday
Oct062015

Battle of the Forces: Army Vs Police 64th Annual Sukuna Bowl Competition

 

The week of the Rugby World Cup 2015 start was a busy one for the defence forces of Fiji. Fortunately not in relation to keeping Fiji safe, but in honouring and celebrating sports by building team spirit,  demonstrating sportsmanship and displaying physical prowess in the 64th annual Sukuna Bowl Competition.

The enlisted sporting talents were not exclusive to just the workforce, but also to the spouses, making this a family friendly event. Thus, through my Fijian family connection, herself an Army wife and ex-participant of the games, I was invited to attend the netball and volleyball event at the Vodafone arena. We arrived at the netball centre to the sounds of cheers from the Army support coloured red and green, and the Police supporters all in blue.

It was a hot day, and I did not envy the players for battling it out in such heat.  The closest and most suspenseful match was between the Netball Team B’s of the Police and Army force, with the Army just nabbing the win. It was a valiant effort from both sides, and watching the netball matches riled a deep nostalgia within me for the game.

Netball, volleyball and rugby are all sports taught within Fiji’s physical education curriculum in schools, and the skills displayed on the courts that day represented strong home-grown talent. Rugby, the most popular sport in Fiji, was the event saved for the final day of the games which saw the Police  force successfully defend their title for another year with a 25-17 win, as well as winning the games overall and taking home the Sukuna Bowl (a kava bowl, of course). Asides from rugby on the final day, games of tug of war were also played!

History of the games show that the Police force have come out on top more often, with a record of 30 Sukuna bowl wins to the Army’s 23, including this year’s triumph. The battles were intense, the atmosphere electric, the talent strong, the skills impressive and my experience worth it. Anything that bonds people as well as bringing out the best in them is something worthwhile of celebrating. Call me biased, but fingers crossed for an Army win in 2016!

By Sophia Victorian - Project Coordinator

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Fiji.

Check out what volunteers in Fiji are up to right now!

Wednesday
Sep302015

The Terror Of TerrorTrekking

I can barely drive my car in England, let alone a huge off-road buggy

I wanted to spend my final full day in Fiji doing something that little bit crazy. The magazine that I was volunteering for, Mai Life, had never featured Terratrek before, and so they were happy for me, and our other journalism intern, Jorah, to give it a go and write a feature on it.

Terratrek is an off-road driving tour company, situated in Pacific Harbour, about a 45-minute bus journey from Suva. Thanks to Mai Life, we managed to get what would otherwise have been a F$299 pp tour, absolutely free, and we were over the moon!

When we arrived at the Terratrek office, we were asked to fit ourselves with incredibly attractive huge red helmets, and after looking and feeling the part, we both had to complete a test drive. Despite being incredibly nervous, and driving on the left-hand side for the first time ever, I did surprisingly well and was ready for the journey ahead.

I drove the buggy on the way, and completely outdid the expectations I had of myself. The drive was full of dangerous drops and so many slopes, but surprisingly I only veered off course once. Although I absolutely terrified Jorah at that point, after a 40-minute drive we arrived safe and sound at the beginning of the waterfall trail.

We were given huge wooden walking sticks to help us on our hike, but I wasn’t expecting what lay ahead. Because of the week of unfortunate rain that had hit Fiji, the path to the waterfall was horrendously muddy. I was basically replaying my experience of the Nadi mud baths, but this time the mud was bright orange clay. The guides found it hilarious that I was wearing white, yes white, converse. But luckily they were my old pair, meant to be completely and utterly ruined in Fiji, as I had a brand new pair at home, waiting for my return.

 

One of our guides told us there’d be a ‘lot of bum sliding’ on the way down, and it wasn’t long before I knew what he meant. The clay mud was soaking wet and so incredibly slippery that on several occasions I almost went bum first on the floor, and had to suddenly grab a random branch or a guide’s hand, who assured us they’d catch us if we fell. Unfortunately for Jorah, however, she did end up bum first in the mud, and what a pretty sight she looked by the end of the trek. You definitely could tell we’d been on Terratrek, with orange smears all over Jorah’s leggings, and my shoes practically invisible due to being caked in clay. But there’s no doubt we had a great time.

When we eventually got to the twin waterfalls, after a hard hike and a series of ghost stories told to me by one of the guide’s, Jack, it was worth the bumps and bruises. Despite at first chickening out of swimming in the pool, due to the weather being grey and a bit cold, we eventually gave in as it was really beautiful and being my last day in Fiji, why not?

After our swim we sat down for a picnic lunch, provided by Terratrek, and had a lovely chat with our guides. Usa, one of the guides, practically pulled me up the hill during the whole hike back, but it was definitely easier than it had been on the way down. Jorah drove magnificently on our journey home, and despite the struggle of driving down continuous slopes, she was so smooth that I actually fell asleep for a few seconds.

When we’d finished the Terratrek we were both completely exhausted and after scrubbing down our shoes, we headed to a café for much needed chocolate cake and chips. We both slept well that night, that’s for sure, and I still can’t believe I didn’t crash!

By Bethany Baulkham - Fiji Journalism

Find out more about Frontier's volunteering projects in Fiji.

Check out what volunteers in Fiji are up to right now!