Entries in marine biology (6)

Wednesday
Nov302016

New Research: Pilot Whales Babysit Calves

A team of scientists discover a new behaviour displayed by Pilot Whales in Canada. Just like babysitting in humans, alloparental care is the care of a young animal by another adult that is not its parent, known as the alloparent. The phenomenon is common in many social animals, even fish, but this is the first study identifying it in Pilot Whales.

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Thursday
Nov242016

Marine Protected Areas Explained

One fifth of known ocean species are categorized as Threatened by the IUCN, with the number increasing 52 times per year! But did you know only 1.2% of our oceans are protected from threats that face them today? Never before have Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) been more valuable for ocean species conservation, our Online Media Intern investigates how they work and what their future holds.

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Monday
Nov232015

What a Load of Rubbish: The Problems of the Platisphere 

A group of marine biologists stand in full protective gear surveying the scene in front of them, which is something of a mess. The 15-meter long sperm whale carcass, which is draped across the Tainan coastline, would be a cause for attention on most days, but this whale is about to achieve a level of notoriety that most others have not. It is full of plastic. 

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Wednesday
Jun042014

World Oceans Day 2014

Celebrated annually on 8 June, World Oceans Day (WOD) is an opportunity to raise global awareness

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Monday
Jun022014

Volunteer Photo of the Week: Charlie Wheeler

Charlie Wheeler took this photo in the ocean surrounding Mafia Island, whilst on Frontier's Madagascar Marine Conservation and Diving.

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Friday
Jun072013

World Oceans Day - what will you promise?

In honour of World Oceans Day, annually held on the 8th June, The Ocean Project is asking everyone to make a pledge in order to help preserve the ocean and the species that live within it.

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