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Wednesday
Oct012014

Into the Wild Meets: Jill Inman

When the travel bug bites, it’s hard not to scratch the itch. Today, Into the Wild blog meets Jill Inman, creator of iquitmyjobtotravel.com who decided to leave it all behind and travel. We found the premise interesting and exciting, so we decided to interview her and talk about her experiences and blog writing.

What is the inspiration behind your decision to quit your job and start travelling? 

Seeing amazing pictures and reading about far-away places in magazines has always fascinated me. I did the fairly standard Europe backpacking trip after graduating from university and after that I caught “the travel bug”. Subsequently, all my meagre vacation time while working was dedicated to trips to Asia, Europe, or wherever else I could manage to go in a week or two at a time. But after working as an engineer for several years I had reached a point in my career that I realized I didn’t want to continue with that trajectory and decided that this was the perfect time to take off and see a lot of the places that many people only dream about seeing. If I was going to quit my job anyway, I might as well do it to travel.

All images courtesy of Jill Inman, owner of iquitmyjobtotravel.com

What is the driving force behind your committed documentation of your travels?

 My blog started simply as a way for my family to keep track of me so I wouldn’t have to call home as frequently to ease my worried mother’s fears. It turns out more people were actually interested in reading my ramblings and seeing my pictures so I’ve kept it going, albeit far less frequently lately.

How did you fund your excursions? Were there moments when you were far from home and strapped for cash?

 After several years of working as an engineer saving quite a big percentage of my pay-checks, I had set aside enough that my bank account was my sole source of funding. Through a combination of good planning and very thrifty spending while traveling I never ran into any financial problems.

 

Some of your past travel destinations and the nature by which you sometimes travelled alone must have made your parents anxious. What do they have to say about your adventures?

My parents weren’t thrilled with some of my chosen destinations but had basically accepted that I’m going to do what I want to do; nevertheless my mom still blames her grey hair on my traveling…. That being said, I do take great care in researching places before I go and making sure that I’m not putting myself in potentially compromising situations and they do acknowledge and appreciate that.

If you could invent anything to make your travelling experiences easier, what would it be?

This may be geared more towards the typical US corporate mentality and vacation policy, but having a culture that allows (or dare I say encourages) longer sabbaticals would definitely be the one thing I would change. Living in a country that puts such heavy emphasis on prior career experiences, instead of life experiences, makes it a lot more difficult to explain resume gaps for extensive travel and still climb the corporate ladder. Also cheaper and more universally compatible international cell phones and data plans.

Can you see yourself living permanently in any of the countries you have visited? Which country would you choose and why? Alternatively, what makes you feel reluctant to settle down in a new country?

There are several countries that I definitely want to go back and visit more extensively, but living in another isn’t as high on my priority list, right now at least. The main reason is that I’m entering a new career after finishing up graduate school so that is really my focus at the moment. And being an American there is already a wide variety of location options within my own country that can grow my career without the aggravation of work visas.

What destination would you recommend to your worst enemy?

I think there is something to be learned from anywhere you travel, good experiences and bad. And that to me is the most important part of traveling. So with that in mind, I would recommend my worst enemy simply stay home and never venture out.

What’s the worst flying experience you have had and why?

One of the more disappointing experiences associated with flying was when I lost my status on an airline alliance. During my trip, I managed to obtain platinum status so I enjoyed the benefits of free food and wifi in first class lounges, but then I lost it and had to go back to the ordinary waiting areas and paying for food… But in all seriousness, luckily I haven’t had any bad flying experiences.

People often travel to experience the feeling of adventure. How would you define adventure?

Adventure to me is experiencing something totally different than everyday life - seeing and doing things that cause you to learn new things and change in some small way.

What’s the single, best piece of travel orientated advice you have ever received?

Just do it. There will always be reasons to postpone traveling, but in the long run very few will be remembered the same way as traveling will be.

 

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When the travel bug bites, it’s hard not to scratch the itch. Today, Into the Wild blog meets Jill Inman, creator of iquitmyjobtotravel.com who decided to leave it all behind and travel. We found the premise interesting and exciting, so we decided to interview her and talk about her experiences and blog writing.

 

What is the inspiration behind your decision to quit your job and start travelling?

 

Seeing amazing pictures and reading about far-away places in magazines has always fascinated me. I did the fairly standard Europe backpacking trip after graduating from university and after that I caught “the travel bug”. Subsequently, all my meagre vacation time while working was dedicated to trips to Asia, Europe, or wherever else I could manage to go in a week or two at a time. But after working as an engineer for several years I had reached a point in my career that I realized I didn’t want to continue with that trajectory and decided that this was the perfect time to take off and see a lot of the places that many people only dream about seeing. If I was going to quit my job anyway, I might as well do it to travel.

 

All images courtesy of Jill Inman, owner of iquitmyjobtotravel.com

 

What is the driving force behind your committed documentation of your travels?

 

My blog started simply as a way for my family to keep track of me so I wouldn’t have to call home as frequently to ease my worried mother’s fears. It turns out more people were actually interested in reading my ramblings and seeing my pictures so I’ve kept it going, albeit far less frequently lately.

 

How did you fund your excursions? Were there moments when you were far from home and strapped for cash?

 

After several years of working as an engineer saving quite a big percentage of my pay-checks, I had set aside enough that my bank account was my sole source of funding. Through a combination of good planning and very thrifty spending while traveling I never ran into any financial problems.

 

Some of your past travel destinations and the nature by which you sometimes travelled alone must have made your parents anxious. What do they have to say about your adventures?

 

My parents weren’t thrilled with some of my chosen destinations but had basically accepted that I’m going to do what I want to do; nevertheless my mom still blames her grey hair on my traveling…. That being said, I do take great care in researching places before I go and making sure that I’m not putting myself in potentially compromising situations and they do acknowledge and appreciate that.

 

If you could invent anything to make your travelling experiences easier, what would it be?

 

This may be geared more towards the typical US corporate mentality and vacation policy, but having a culture that allows (or dare I say encourages) longer sabbaticals would definitely be the one thing I would change. Living in a country that puts such heavy emphasis on prior career experiences, instead of life experiences, makes it a lot more difficult to explain resume gaps for extensive travel and still climb the corporate ladder. Also cheaper and more universally compatible international cell phones and data plans.

 

 

 

Can you see yourself living permanently in any of the countries you have visited? Which country would you choose and why? Alternatively, what makes you feel reluctant to settle down in a new country?

 

There are several countries that I definitely want to go back and visit more extensively, but living in another isn’t as high on my priority list, right now at least. The main reason is that I’m entering a new career after finishing up graduate school so that is really my focus at the moment. And being an American there is already a wide variety of location options within my own country that can grow my career without the aggravation of work visas.

 

 

What destination would you recommend to your worst enemy?

 

I think there is something to be learned from anywhere you travel, good experiences and bad. And that to me is the most important part of traveling. So with that in mind, I would recommend my worst enemy simply stay home and never venture out.

 

What’s the worst flying experience you have had and why?

 

One of the more disappointing experiences associated with flying was when I lost my status on an airline alliance. During my trip, I managed to obtain platinum status so I enjoyed the benefits of free food and wifi in first class lounges, but then I lost it and had to go back to the ordinary waiting areas and paying for food… But in all seriousness, luckily I haven’t had any bad flying experiences.

 

People often travel to experience the feeling of adventure. How would you define adventure?

 

Adventure to me is experiencing something totally different than everyday life - seeing and doing things that cause you to learn new things and change in some small way.

 

What’s the single, best piece of travel orientated advice you have ever received?

 

Just do it. There will always be reasons to postpone traveling, but in the long run very few will be remembered the same way as traveling will be.